Schmitz Park Boulevard Restoration Begins

Seattle Parks and Recreation is happy to announce that the first of five Olmsted restoration sites, Schmitz Park Boulevard, is moving into construction. The Seattle Conservation Corps will work with Seattle Parks and Recreation’s carpentry, concrete, and metal shops to create a permanent pathway up the hill at SW Stevens St. and 52nd to 58th Ave. SW near the park entrance closest to the Alki Community Center. This project will include a stairway and habitat restoration. The project construction will begin in mid-May and be completed by the end of the summer.

The following other projects are moving forward with design and construction:

  • Lake Washington Boulevard park – Colman Park
    • Improves the drainage and landscape of the area near the upper bridge.
  • Magnolia Boulevard   
    • Restoration and revegetation of the historic Madrone trees at Magnolia Boulevard.

Scoping and early design work is commencing for:

  • Lake Washington Boulevard
  • Lower Woodland Park

These five historical Olmsted parks and boulevards were selected out the Olmsted Park Study and prioritized on community feedback received in early 2019 as well as on a set of criteria that included feasibility, equity, recent improvements, and fundraising potential. Funding for the projects is provided by the Seattle Park District Major Maintenance Initiative.

Thank you to the Friends of Seattle’s Olmsted Parks and the over 1,300 people who participated in the online survey that helped us prioritize the ten sites (Magnolia Blvd., Queen Anne Blvd, Lake Washington Blvd. parks (Lakeview Park, Colman Park, Mount Baker Park), Hiawatha Park, Volunteer Park, Schmitz Park, Woodland Park, and Washington Park Arboretum) for funding allocation. 

Seattle’s Olmsted Parks and Boulevards began as a dream the City of Seattle had in the late 1800’s for a beautiful system of landscapes among urban growth. This vision was implemented in the form of parks throughout the city designed by the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm. The basis of design for these parks was to allow access to attractive open spaces to provide peace and respite for all.

To review the survey results and stay up to date on the projects please visit please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/olmsted-parks-and-boulevards-restoration-project

For additional questions please contact Michelle Whitfield, Capital Project Coordinator at michelle.whitfield@seattle.gov or 206-465-8492.