Seattle Channel videos feature Seattle Park District

It’s been just over two years since Seattle voters approved Proposition 1 to create the Seattle Park District, and projects and programs funded by the District are in full swing.

Recently, Seattle Parks and Recreation teamed with the Seattle Channel to produce three 30-minute videos that highlight some of the work being accomplished in neighborhoods throughout the city. The videos, collectively entitled “The Seattle Park District: Investing in People and Parks,” first aired on the Seattle Channel in September and are available online at the links below.

Hosted by veteran television reporter Brian Callanan, the three shows feature different aspects of the Park District, each one beginning with a TV news-like report, followed by a discussion panel with Callanan, Seattle Parks and Recreation Superintendent Jesús Aguirre and two community members:

  • The first episode focuses on Maintaining Parks and Facilities, including maintenance of community centers, forest restoration efforts, playfield resurfacing and the enforcement of leash laws for dogs.1
  • The second episode features Programs for People, including a summer camp for youth with disabilities, the Arts in the Parks Program, the Get Moving Program, which encourages physical activity for people of all ages, and the Senior Food and Fitness Program. 2
  • The third episode highlights projects in the Building for the Future initiative, including parkland acquisition, park improvements, and partnerships to activate downtown parks. 3

Approved by voters in 2014, the Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation. 2016 was the first full year of implementation and has included funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and funds the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information, please visit this web page.