Seniors admitted FREE to Japanese Garden on Respect for Elders Day

The Seattle Japanese Garden will celebrate Respect for Elders Day on Monday, September 15, 2014. In honor of this Japanese holiday, seniors age 65 and older will receive free admission to the garden.

Complimentary guided tours will be available starting at 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m. on that day.

All visitors are welcome to experience a traditional Japanese tea ceremony in the Tateuchi Community Room at the Garden Gatehouse. The room is wheelchair accessible and chairs will be provided. Ceremonies start at 2 p.m., 3 p.m., and 4 p.m. Tea ceremony tickets are $7 per person, and can be purchased in advanced by calling the ticket booth at 206-684-4725.

The Seattle Japanese Garden is located at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E. For driving directions and detailed information about the garden, please visit www.seattlejapanesegarden.org.

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Japanese Noh theater at Seattle Japanese Garden on Sept. 25

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Experience traditional Noh theater in a performance at the Seattle Japanese Garden on Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The garden will be open for twilight viewing at 5:30 p.m.

Munenori Takeda and the Takeda Noh Troupe will present three Noh vignettes that will give the audience a glimpse of their upcoming performance at Seattle’s ACT Theatre. The performance, entitled “The Universality of Noh: Crossing Borders on Stage,” will be on the Moon Viewing Stage in the garden with seating in the orchard. Bring a blanket or tatami mat to sit on.

Munenori Takeda was born into a family of pre-eminent Noh actors belonging to the Kanze School, which traces its roots to the 1300s in Japan. He is widely recognized as one of the most talented young Noh performers in Japan today.

Tickets are $10, and on sale now at the Garden, or by phone at 206-684-4725, or at the gate on Sept. 25. The Seattle Japanese Garden is located at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. S, Seattle WA.

The event is sponsored by the Seattle Japanese Garden Advisory Council, the Japan World Exposition1910 Commemorative Fund, Kansai Osaka 21st Century Association, the Toshiba Foundation, the Asahi Shinbun Foundation, the Japan Arts Connection Lab, and Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Seattle Japanese Garden presents Moon Viewing Sept. 6

From 7-10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 6, the Seattle Japanese Garden will light up lanterns, luminaries and floating boats to welcome the full moon in keeping with Japanese tradition.9043702783_6a0fb16c58_n

The community is invited to this enchanted event that will take place after-hours in the garden. Traditional Japanese dances will be performed by the Fujima Fujimine Dance Ensemble and music will be played on shakuhachi and koto by James Jennings, Marcia Takamura and Chigusa Kitai.

Evocative movement art will be performed by Kogut Butoh, and Haiku Northwest will host a poetry writing contest.

Visitors can get a special look at the moon through telescopes provided by the Seattle Astronomical Society.

Three tea ceremonies, led by Tankokai, will be held in the Shoseian Teahouse in the garden.

General admission tickets are $15. Admission with a tea ceremony is $25. Tickets must be purchased in advance at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/822035.

The Japanese Garden gates will open at 6 p.m. for the event. The garden is located at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E. For more information, please visit http://www.seattlejapanesegarden.org/moonviewingfestival.html.
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Get creative in the Conservatory: It’s never too late to learn with Lifelong Recreation

Summer program registration opens May 20

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Artist Lisa Snow Lady, left, leads a tour through the Volunteer Park Conservatory where she is teaching a Lifelong Recreation class this spring.

 

Last year Mary Hsu was traveling in Japan when she came across a woman sightseeing with an open sketch pad in front of her.

“She was making the most beautiful drawings,” Hsu said. “I thought to myself, I want to do that.”

Last week, Hsu was at the Volunteer Park Conservatory for a sketching and watercolor course taught by artist Lisa Snow Lady. The class, offered through Seattle Parks and Recreation Lifelong Recreation, teaches participants how to document their individual journeys through drawings and paintings.

Snow Lady is a visual artist and has a degree in ornamental horticulture. She said teaching a class in Volunteer Park is a perfect way to draw on all of her strengths.

“I want the class to be loose sketching, like you’re traveling,” Snow Lady said. “We have plenty of places to explore right here: the Cactus House, the Palm House. We can pretend we’re somewhere exotic.”

Participant Linda Pauw earned an art degree in college and recently started drawing again.

“I have seen Lisa’s travel sketchbooks, and I’m in awe of them,” Pauw said.

Lifelong Recreation participant Shari Congdon practices sketching a tulip during a warm up exercise.

Lifelong Recreation participant Shari Congdon practices sketching a tulip during a warm up exercise.

Many of the students have past artistic experience and are looking to sharpen their skills. Student Pam Generaux taught art for 30 years in Seattle schools but had never received formal watercolor training.

“I love being a part of a class and exchanging ideas,” Generaux said.

Generaux demonstrates that it’s never too late to learn a new skill or improve an existing talent. The Lifelong Recreation course is designed to be a relaxed atmosphere where people can feel comfortable exploring their surroundings.

“It doesn’t matter if you make a mistake,” Snow Lady said. “It’s just paper, and it’s just ink.”

Snow Lady requires participants to use pens for sketching so they’re not tempted to erase and work under the constraints of perfection.

This class, which is also offered in the Japanese Garden, was created three years ago. Lifelong Recreation Specialist Cheryl Brown said she’d like to see participation increase.

“This is one of the few opportunities we have to use these venues,” she said. “This has been a great partnership that has opened up the doors of these beautiful specialty spaces to artists of all kinds.”

Student Shari Congdon said the location was one thing that drew her to the class.

“What a great opportunity to come to a beautiful place and sketch.”

Another art course held in the Japanese Garden and Volunteer Park will be offered this summer.

Lifelong Recreation offers a wide range of fitness and social programs designed for people 50 years or older; however, this specific art class is open to anyone over 18. Summer registration opens on May 20.

Seattle Japanese Garden celebrates Opening Day First Viewing

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The Seattle Japanese Garden’s 2014 season opens on Saturday, March 1 with a celebration from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. To ensure a wonderful season, Reverend Koichi Barrish of the Tsubaki Grand Shrine will honor the Japanese Garden with the traditional Shinto blessing at noon.

This 3 ½ acre formal garden evokes another time and place, a unique and artistic representation of nature influenced by Shinto, Buddhist, and Tao philosophies. Designed and built under the supervision of world-renowned Japanese garden designer Juki Iida in 1960, the garden is a quiet place, allowing reflection and meditation through the careful placement of water, garden plants, stones, waterfalls, trees and bridges.

Admission fees for First Viewing are: $10 for adults 18-64, $5 for youths 6–17, senior adults 65+, college students with ID, and people with disabilities, and free for kids younger than 6.

For free, the community is invited to enjoy the opening of a beautiful new photography exhibit “A Celebration of Spring”  from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Tateuchi Community Room.  The juried show also on March 1 celebrates nine photographers and their fantastic views of the Garden from a spring workshop in 2013.

The Japanese Garden offers monthly tea presentations and demonstration at the Tea House and other great community events during the March -November season when it is open to the public

Seattle Japanese Garden 2014 Schedule

March 1 – March 30                               Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
March 31 – Sept. 21                                Monday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
September 22 – Sept. 30                       Monday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
October 1 – Nov. 2                                  Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
November 3 – Nov. 30                           Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The Japanese Garden is located at the south end of the Washington Park Arboretum at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E. For more information please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm or call 206-684-4725.

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Seattle Parks to reopen Japanese Garden for the 2013 season

First Viewing: Celebrate the reopening of the Seattle Japanese Garden!
The Seattle Japanese Garden’s 2013 season opens on Sunday, March 3 with a traditional Shinto blessing and a calligraphy workshop.

To ensure a wonderful season, Reverend Koichi Barrish of the Tsubaki Grand Shrine will honor the Japanese Garden with the traditional Shinto blessing, and Meito Shodo Kai’s hands-on calligraphy workshop will offer visitors an opportunity to create elegant Japanese calligraphy.

The Shinto Blessing begins at noon and the drop-in calligraphy workshop takes place from 1-3 p.m. Both events are free with Japanese Garden admission.

Admission fees for First Viewing are: $10 for adults 18-64, $5 for Youths 6–17, Senior Adults 65+, College students with ID, & people with disabilities, and free for kids younger than 6.

Can’t make it to First Viewing?
Visit the Japanese Garden on Sunday, March 10 for the opening of Autumn Impressions, a juried show of 13 photographers’ views of the Seattle Japanese Garden captured in the October 2012 Photography Workshop. From 1-3 p.m., this casual event will celebrate the photographers and their fantastic views of the Garden. There is no admission charge for the Autumn Impressions opening event.

This 3 ½ acre formal garden evokes another time and place, a unique and artistic representation of nature influenced by Shinto, Buddhist, and Tao philosophies. Designed and built under the supervision of world-renowned Japanese garden designer Juko Iida in 1960, the garden is a quiet place, allowing reflection and meditation through the careful placement of water, garden plants, stones, waterfalls, trees, and bridges.

The Japanese Garden offers occasional tea ceremonies and other events during the March -November season when it is open to the public. Information: http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm.

Seattle Japanese Garden 2013 Schedule
March 1 – March 30: Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
March 31 – Sept 21: Monday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
September 22 – September 30: Monday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
October 1 – November 2: Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
November 3 – November 30: Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

The Japanese Garden is located at the south end of the Washington Park Arboretum at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E.

Guides needed for Seattle Parks and Recreation Japanese Garde

The Japanese Garden at Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Washington Park Arboretum has opened applications for training to become a volunteer tour guide.

The Japanese Garden displays beautiful foliage throughout the year.

Tour guides will give free guided tours to garden visitors and must learn the techniques of effective guides, elements of the Japanese Garden, Japanese history and culture, and the history and unique features of the Seattle Japanese Garden.

Training will be held on five consecutive Wednesdays, March 13 through April 10, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The fee for the training program is $50. A limited number of scholarships are available. The deadline for application is February 1, 2013.

Located within the Washington Park Arboretum, the Japanese Garden is a 3.5-acre formal garden designed and constructed under the supervision of world-renowned Japanese garden designer Juki Iida in 1960.

The Japanese Garden offers free public tours with admission on weekend days at 12:30 p.m., and 2:30 p.m., April through October. All tours start from the main gate, and are led by Arboretum Foundation Unit 86 Tour Guides. These tours provide an educational introduction to the culture and history of the Seattle Japanese Garden.

For details, and to download an application, please visit                                                         http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm 

For questions, contact:  gardenguidetraining@gmail.com

Seattle’s Japanese Garden is seeking new tour guides

The Japanese Garden at Seattle’s Parks and Recreation’s Washington Park Arboretum has opened applications for training to become a volunteer tour guide.

Tour guides will give free guided tours to garden visitors and must learn the techniques of effective guides, elements of the Japanese Garden, Japanese history and culture, and the history and unique features of the Seattle Japanese Garden.

Training will be held on five consecutive Wednesdays, March 13 through April 10, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The fee for the training program is $100. A limited number of scholarships are available. The deadline for application is January 18, 2013.

Located within the Washington Park Arboretum, the Japanese Garden is a 3.5-acre formal garden designed and constructed under the supervision of world-renowned Japanese garden designer Juki Iida in 1960.

The Japanese Garden offers public tours free with admission on weekend days at 12:30 p.m., and 2:30 p.m., April through October. All tours start from the main gate, and are led by Arboretum Foundation Unit 86 Docents. These tours provide an educational introduction to the culture and history of the Seattle Japanese Garden.

For details, and to download an application, please visit                                                         http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm 

For questions, contact:  gardenguidetraining@gmail.com

Celebrate Tanabata with the Seattle Japanese Garden and The Wing

On Saturday, July 7, 2012 celebrate Tanabata, an annual Japanese festival, at The Wing and the Seattle Japanese Garden. A free shuttle will transport you between the celebration locations on the half hour from 1-5:30 p.m. Throughout the day, The Wing and the Seattle Japanese Garden will offer reciprocal admission to visitors. The Wing is located at 719 South King Street and the Seattle Japanese Garden is located in the Washington Park Arboretum at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd E.  Admission tickets may be purchased at either location.

 Tanabata, (Evening of the Seventh) is based on the legend of Orihime and Hikoboshi, star crossed lovers separated by the Milky Way. According to legend, each year on the evening of July 7th, Orihime and Hikoboshi are allowed to reunite for one night only. In Japan, Tanabata is celebrated by decorating bamboo branches with origami ornaments and tanzaku, poems or wishes written on small strips of paper.

The Wing will offer crafts by the Drachen Foundation and PAPER from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and kinetic storytelling with Eth-Noh-Tec at 10:30 and 11:30 a.m.

From 1-5 p.m. at the Japanese Garden enjoy crafts by Garden volunteers, calligraphy by Meito Shodo Kai, and nature-themed activities by the Washington Park Arboretum Education and Outreach Unit. Garden tours will be offered at 12:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. and Fujima Dance Ensemble will present a selection of traditional Japanese dances at 2:00 p.m.

For an additional $5 required ticket you may experience a tea ceremony in the Shoseian teahouse at 1, 2 or 3 p.m. Reservations are encouraged for the tea ceremony.For more information on this celebration or to make reservation for the tea ceremony please contact the Seattle Japanese Garden at 206-684-4725 or visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/parkspaces/japanesegarden.htm

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Japanese Garden to Celebrate Children’s Day

Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Japanese Garden will celebrate the healthy growth and happiness of children during our Children’s Day celebration on Monday, May 30, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Entertainment will include Mimibunko performing a Japanese language puppet show and Fujima Dance Ensemble performing a selection of traditional Japanese dances. Hands-on craft and cultural activities will be available throughout the day, including origami tutorials and an opportunity for children to try on Japanese yukata — a casual summer kimono, usually made of cotton. Children will have the opportunity to investigate the leaves and insects of the garden with activities provided by the Washington Park Arboretum Education and Outreach unit. 

Children’s Day is a Japanese national holiday, which traditionally takes place on May 5, the fifth day of the fifth month. It is a day set aside to respect children’s personalities and to celebrate their happiness. It was designated a national holiday by the Japanese government in 1948. 

Please note that Seattle Japanese Garden Annual Passes are not applicable during the Children’s Day event. Event admission is $10 for adults, with up to two children free (age 12 and younger) per paying adult, with each additional child $4. Event admission for adults without children is $10. Admission for ages 13 -17, senior adults 65 and older, college students with ID, and people with disabilities, is $5. 

The Japanese Garden is located at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd E, Seattle WA 98112. To contact the Garden, call (206) 684-4725. The Japanese Garden is open 7 days a week from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.

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