Seattle Parks and Recreation announces 2016 Denny Award winners

Annual awards recognize outstanding volunteer service

Today Superintendent Jesús Aguirre announced the winners of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s 2016 Denny Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Stewardship. The winners are a cross-section of Seattle’s most creative, dedicated and hard-working volunteers who donate precious time and energy to improving Seattle’s parks and recreation programs.

“Choosing award winners was a difficult task for us,” Aguirre said. “We are grateful to the many volunteers who contribute to Seattle Parks and Recreation’s mission of supporting healthy people, a healthy environment, and strong communities.”

In 2015, 38,386 people volunteered for Seattle Parks and Recreation, providing 270,360 hours of service, which is a donation valued by Independent Sector at $23.07 per hour or $6.2 million dollars in 2015.

AWARDS
Healthy People:
Leon Preston, Garfield Community Center
Leon Preston has served for more than 10 years as a Taekwondo teacher for participants ages 6 to adult at Garfield Community Center. Students from Leon’s program have competed in meets around the world. Leon’s goals while working with youth are to build life skills, self-confidence, leadership skills and compassion, and to promote racial understanding and engage at-risk youth. Leon has been teaching and practicing Taekwondo for 40 years and was a 2008 Olympic Games referee in Beijing, China.

Healthy People:
Leatha Bailey, Sound Steps, Rainier Beach Community Center
Leatha Bailey has volunteered for ten years as a Sound Steps walk leader, helping over 100 mostly senior walkers improve their health. Leatha helps support healthy people in the community by teaching behavior change, encouraging participants to lead a healthy lifestyle, transporting those who can’t walk to activities, and presenting at health fairs.

Healthy Environment:
Tom Kelly, Magnuson Environmental Stewardship Alliance and Green Seattle Partnership, Magnuson Park
For more than 20 years, Tom has removed invasive plants and planted native species to help restore acres of forested parkland at Magnuson Park. Tom has led hundreds of work parties with both students and corporate groups. In total, Tom has led 15,000 hours of volunteer work and planted 11,000 native trees and shrubs. This year, Tom’s quick action with CPR saved the life of a Forest Steward who had a heart attack at Magnuson Park. Tom is also a mentor for the UW Restoration Ecology Network Program.

Healthy Environment:
East African Senior Meal Program, Yesler Community Center
East African Senior Meal Program volunteers at Yesler Community Center grow food at the Rainier Beach Urban Farm and bring it to the community center to cook and share with others. Over the past seven years, the Senior Meal Program has grown from only Ethiopian/ Eritrean elders to include Asian, Caucasian, mixed and African American backgrounds. The program helps elder adults access free, healthy, homemade and traditional food.

Strong Communities:
Rainier Community Center Advisory Council
For more than 20 years, the Rainier Community Center Advisory Council has supported countless volunteers, special events and fundraisers to encourage new, diverse programs for community members in this multicultural neighborhood.Council volunteers have helped to not only advise Seattle Parks and Recreation staff but also to be proactive in recruiting new members, creating new events, supporting new community initiatives like Rainier Valley Radio and Community Kitchens.

Strong Communities:
Andrew Miller, Lake City Community Center
Andrew has donated his time and materials as an artist to engage Lake City Young Leaders Teens in making murals to highlight the diversity of the neighborhood. Lake City Community Center volunteers are helping Seattle Parks and Recreation engage teens in cultural placemaking in Lake City.

Equity Champion:
Carol Valdrighi, Magnuson Community Center and Magnuson Park Advisory Council
Carol has advocated and raised resources so that diverse children from low-income families who live in the Solid Ground housing at the Magnuson Campus can take part in programs. Carol has created partnerships with Sand Point Elementary and their Parent Teacher Association, has tutored young children and taught parents how to apply for scholarships, and has advocated for an expanded Magnuson Park Community Center with more program hours.

Equity Champion:
Nancy Olsen, Lifelong Recreation, Sound Steps and Dementia-Friendly Recreation
Nancy and her husband Steve joined Lifelong Recreation’s Sound Steps walking program in 2007, and they founded the Sound Striders in South Seattle walking group in 2008. When Nancy’s husband was diagnosed with dementia, they decided to continue their walks and connect with others dealing with this loss by providing walk participants with stimulation and a supportive community. The committee decided to recommend Nancy for the Equity Champion award because inclusion for all abilities is an important part of social equity.

Superintendent’s Award:
Sea Mar Community Health
Founded in 1978 with the sole mission to provide comprehensive health and human services to families in Washington State, Sea Mar Community Health Center is a supremely reputable community-based organization that has honed its services and ties to South Park by positively impacting the health and wellness of its patrons though the execution of case management, medical, dental, as well as behavioral health services. Leveraging Preventative Health Programs as well as Community, Education and Service Learning Programs that aim to increase the healthy eating habits amongst its clients, this organization engages in a plethora of program services that help South Park build a sense of community. In building that community, this organization has partnered with the South Park Community Center to extend its recreational and preventative health services. These services include not only a Soccer Preventative Health Program that serves an average of 235 youth annually, but also cooking programs, health education services and fitness activities that reach upwards of 1,500 community members annually.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is extremely grateful to the thousands of people who dedicate themselves to supporting healthy people, a healthy environment, and strong communities.

The Denny Awards are named after David T. and Louisa Denny, who in 1884 donated land for the first Seattle park (Denny Park), where Seattle Parks and Recreation headquarters is located.

Seattle Parks and Recreation gratefully acknowledges Denny Award sponsors and supporters: ARC, Seattle Park Foundation, and Parker Design House.
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Seattle Parks and Recreation seeks nominations for annual volunteer awards

dennytSeattle Parks and Recreation is seeking nominations for the Denny Awards, which honor extraordinary volunteer service to the city’s parks and recreation system. The deadline for nominations is Sunday, Oct. 30, 2016. The electronic nomination form is available here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NSCGVXZ

The awards will be presented at a recognition ceremony to be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec.6, 2016 in the Brotman Forum at the Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave.

The Denny Awards acknowledge and honor the crucial role volunteers play in supporting neighborhood parks, community centers and recreation programs throughout Seattle. The awards reflect the early commitment by the Denny family to the preservation of parkland and open space for public use and enjoyment. David T. and Louisa Denny donated land that became the first Seattle park, Denny Park, in 1884.

“Volunteers are one of our most important resources in helping us reach our goals of supporting healthy people, a healthy environment, and strong communities,” said Superintendent Jesús Aguirre. “Our volunteers coach youth sports, help us plant native trees in our parks, serve on various advisory councils and boards, and provide countless other services that allow us to have the first-rate park and recreation system that Seattle loves and depends on.”

Denny Awards nominees should:

  • demonstrate exceptional stewardship of parks and/or recreation;
  • have given a significant commitment of time;
  • provide stellar leadership by supporting SPR’s goals to extend Race and Social Justice, and support Healthy People, a Healthy Environment, and Strong Communities.

In 2015, 38,386 people volunteered for Seattle Parks and Recreation, providing 270,360 hours of service, which is a donation valued by Independent Sector at $23.07 per hour or $6.2 million dollars in 2015.

For additional information, please contact Aretha Alexander, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 206-684-8028, or aretha.alexander@seattle.gov. A list of past award winners is available here.

Denny Award Nominations Open

Denny Awards 2015

The mayor speaks at the 2015 Denny Awards ceremony


Looking for a way to honor an awesome volunteer in your midst? Do you know a volunteer who has excelled at creating Healthy People, Healthy Environment or Strong Communities? A volunteer who has advanced the work of Race and Social Equity in Seattle?

It is time to nominate a volunteer or group who deserves recognition for their contributions to the people of Seattle through Seattle Parks and Recreation!

Mark your calendars! Nominees and winners will be honored Tuesday, December 6th at the Seattle Art Museum from 6 to 8:30 pm.

Please complete the 2016 Denny Award Nomination Form  through Survey Monkey. Also connect with us on our Seattle Parks and Recreation Volunteer Facebook page.

Download the past Denny Award winners list

Photo album: Denny Awards 2015

Denny Awards 2015

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, we hosted the 2015 Denny Awards at the Seattle Museum of Flight to honor this year’s outstanding volunteers. Thank you to everyone who contributed to this wonderful event, and thank you to all of the individuals who donate time to Seattle Parks and Recreation. We could not do our work without you!

Seattle Parks and Recreation announces 2015 Denny Award winners

dennyinvite_header

Annual awards recognize outstanding volunteer service

Today Superintendent Jesús Aguirre announced the winners of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s 2015 Denny Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Stewardship. The winners are a cross-section of Seattle’s most creative, dedicated and hard-working volunteers who donate precious time and energy to improving Seattle’s parks and recreation programs.

“It was difficult for us to choose winners,” Aguirre said. “To us, all of our volunteers are winners. We are so grateful to the many people who make Seattle Parks and Recreation shine.”

In 2014, 36,633 people volunteered for Seattle Parks and Recreation, providing 257,152 hours of service. Winners will be recognized at an awards ceremony on Dec. 1, 2015 at the Museum of Flight. [Read more…]

Parks and Recreation seeks nominations for annual volunteer awards

Seattle Parks and Recreation is seeking nominations for the Denny Awards, which honor volunteer service to the city’s parks and recreation system. The deadline for nominations is Monday, Oct. 19, 2015.

The awards will be presented at a recognition ceremony from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec.1, 2015 at the Museum of Flight at Boeing Field.

The Denny Awards acknowledge and honor the crucial role volunteers play in neighborhood parks, community centers and recreation programs throughout Seattle. In 2014, 36,633 people volunteered for Seattle Parks and Recreation, providing 257,152 hours of service. Though the volunteers’ efforts are invaluable to the department, the Corporation for National and Community Service estimates that the monetary value of a volunteer’s time in the U.S. as $22.55 per hour. That means in 2014, volunteers donated $5,798,777 worth of time to Seattle Parks and Recreation! [Read more…]

2014 Denny Awards winners announced

This week, Seattle Parks and Recreation is privileged to honor nine individuals and organizations who graciously donated their time to our parks system this year. We would like to congratulate all of the winners of this year’s 2014 Denny Awards and thank them for their service to Seattle Parks!

The Denny Awards acknowledge and honor the crucial role volunteers play in neighborhood parks, community centers and recreation programs throughout the city. In 2013, 41,244 people volunteered for Seattle Parks racking up 368,448 hours of service. Though the volunteers’ efforts are invaluable to the department, the Corporation for National and Community Service estimates that the value of a volunteer’s time in Washington is $22.69 per hour. That means in 2013, volunteers donated $8,360,085 worth of time to Seattle Parks!

This year’s winners are:

Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Award
Rich Appleton20140424_091316

Rich Appleton has been volunteering with Seattle Parks and Recreation since 1995. He has been the main volunteer at Nora’s Woods in Seattle’s Central Area since the park’s inception 18 years ago and has continued monthly and annual work parties there ever since. Rich has also been an active volunteer and leader at the nearby Leschi Natural Area since 2000.

Nora’s Woods previously was overrun with blackberry, ivy and other invasive plants and was frequently used as an illegal dump. Rich and other volunteers worked to transform the area into a beautiful neighborhood park, spending hundreds of hours removing invasives, and planting trees, shrubs and other plants. They also installed stairs, benches and walkways.

Rich has also worked with other park stewards to restore the Leschi Natural Area, participating in work parties since 2000. He works at Leschi every week and at Nora’s Woods every other day.

 

Superintendent’s Award
Ken BoundsDSC_7736

Former Seattle Parks and Recreation Superintendent Ken Bounds’ contributions to the city’s parks system were well known during his tenure as the department’s leader in the 1990s and beyond. But Ken’s passion for Seattle parks has extended well into his retirement.

Most recently, Ken was instrumental in the establishment of the Seattle Park District, which secured a stable and sustainable source of parks funding that is the envy of cities around the country. Ken first explored the funding option when the department under his direction put together the 2000 Pro Parks Levy. After he retired, Ken continued to work on the idea and when Proposition 1 went on the ballot in 2014, Ken agreed to serve as chair of the campaign committee, leading a sophisticated campaign on a topic that became a hotly debated issue in the community and in the media.

 

Up and Coming Youth Award
Samuel Bradley_K3A4891

A senior at Roosevelt High School, Samuel Bradley has volunteered with Seattle Parks and Recreation for the past two years.

While he could have spent his last two summers working or doing what typical teenagers do, Sam instead chose to volunteer with Specialized Programs’ summer camp for youth with disabilities, helping provide a camp experience for kids who may not have been able to attend a typical summer camp. In the spring of 2014, Sam also volunteered with Parks’ Special Olympics youth track and field program.

At summer camp, Sam provided invaluable support to counselors and directly engaged with campers with disabilities. He helped with activity planning, the canoe program at Green Lake, and serving meals at an overnight camp. He has accumulated more than 250 volunteer hours during the last two summers and was always willing to go above and beyond what he was asked to do, including staying past his scheduled shift.

 

Making a Difference Award
Clarke Grayclarke

Clarke Gray has worked with Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Green Lake community for nearly 40 years.

As operator of the Green Lake Boat Rental concession at the lake, he built the small brick building that is still being used today for the boat rental operation in exchange for a 10-year concession agreement. Clarke pioneered the use of small row boats, paddle boats, sail boats and paddle boards at the lake, and the boat rental remains one of the most popular attractions at the park.

Beyond his successful business, Clarke has built community goodwill by offering many free hours of use of his equipment for the regattas at the lake and for summer camps for kids. In addition, he has allowed Parks’ Small Craft Center at Green Lake and the Mt. Baker Rowing and Sailing Center on Lake Washington to borrow and test his boats. He eventually sells the water craft to the City at cost.

 

Community Stewardship Award
Homeless Remembrance Project Committeeclose up tree

For more than 10 years, the Homeless Remembrance Project Committee has worked to create places of hope, healing and beauty in memory and in honor of homeless people. The committee is comprised of homeless women, faith leaders, designers, artists and other supporters in partnership with the City of Seattle.

One of those special places is in a portion of Victor Steinbrueck Park in downtown Seattle where “The Tree of Life” sculpture by Clark Wiegman was dedicated in 2012. This is the first sculpture of its kind in the country to honor homeless people and the group has provided stellar leadership to enhance and preserve this park space as a place of gathering for all people. The committee raised $200,000 for the project.

The tree and activities around it have activated a deserted area of the park, bringing numerous disparate communities together in new ways of understanding. This has included people who work at and visit the nearby Pike Place Market, homeless people, local residents, tourists, the faith community, people who advocate for homeless people, and city government.

 

Community Stewardship Award
Mt. Baker Boating Advisory Councilmbrscboathouse

The Mt. Baker Boating Advisory Council has been supporting the Mt. Baker Rowing and Sailing Center for 30 years.

As a volunteer organization within the Associated Recreation Council, the advisory council has committed countless volunteer hours to providing high quality boating activities to the public. Considering the center’s location in southeast Seattle, the council has worked hard to reach out to and include a wide diversity of participants, including youth, adults, seniors, underserved communities, and special populations. The council funds scholarships and offers free public programs to ensure that cost is not a limiting factor to participation. One example: in partnership with the George Pocock Rowing Foundation, the advisory council developed Rainier Valley Rowing, a free program that involves teens of color in year-round competitive rowing. Another free program, the Summer Boating program, provides community youth with free access to kayaks, canoes and other boats. The advisory council raises funds to operate this program at no cost to participants.

One of its finest accomplishments was a project that expanded the center by 5,000 square feet. Over a period of 10 years, the council raised $2.7 million, mostly from small, individual donations and fund-raising projects. The group also obtained thousands of dollars of in-kind services for the project, including support piles and plumbing services. The expansion enabled many more people to participate in healthy recreation. In 2013, attendance in programs exceeded 36,000.


Community Partner Award
Seattle Children’s Hospitallogo_main_sch

For more than 20 years, Seattle Children’s Hospital has partnered with Seattle Parks and Recreation on numerous programs and projects to make water safety a high priority in the community, benefiting thousands of people. As a result, more families wear life jackets, more children know how to swim and more parents understand the critical importance of this life skill.

In particular, Children’s Hospital support has helped build awareness of water safety and scholarships for low-income children and children from various racial and ethnic communities. The hospital provided funding for promoting and marketing swimming lessons and water safety in multiple languages, a water safety brochure, an annual donation for swim lesson scholarships, donated life jackets for loan at public beaches, and discounted life jackets for sale.

In 2012, the Public Relations team from Children’s Hospital filmed a 30-minute program for Spanish-language television station Univision at Medgar Evers Pool. The filming focused on swimming lessons with the goal of encouraging more families to participate in swim lessons and recreational programs.

 

Special Recognition
Parks Legacy Citizens Advisory Committeereport

The 15-member Parks Legacy Citizens Advisory Committee worked for 10 months exploring and eventually recommending a sustainable funding model for Seattle Parks and Recreation. The Seattle Park District, approved by the voters in August, is a direct result of the Committee’s thoughtfulness and hard work.

Committee members came to meetings well-prepared, having done often arduous homework, including reading and editing reports, reading a total of 794 emails and letters from the public over the course of the committee’s tenure, touring parks and facilities to gain a closer understanding of Seattle Parks and Recreation, and thinking through complex issues. As would be expected, there were differences of opinions, but the issues were always respectfully debated and ultimately resolved.

The committee’s diligence and focus on the public good has led to sustainable funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation which will improve lives in Seattle for generations. A special acknowledgement goes to the co-chairs, Charlie Zaragoza and Barbara Wright.

 

Special Recognition
Jen Sonnichsen Parker and Klindt Parkerklindt

Jen Sonnichsen Parker and Klindt Parker of Parker Design House have been supporting the graphic design needs of the Denny Awards for the sixth year running.

Since 2009, Jen and Klindt have been dedicated to ensuring that the graphic design of each year’s Denny Awards is unique and reflects the special qualities of that year’s award winners and ceremony. They are dedicated to producing a top-quality product, and always make time in their busy schedules to be the volunteer graphic designers of record for the annual volunteer awards.

Months before the actual ceremony, Jen and Klindt meet with event organizers to learn more about that year’s venue and theme, and then go back to their offices and brainstorm ideas. They may present as many as six different graphic design options for organizers to choose from. They never skimp on professionalism or creativity because they are donating their services.

Their services to Seattle Parks and Recreation are valued at nearly $28,000, but their contributions are priceless.

Seattle Parks and Recreation seeks nominations for annual volunteer service awards

Seattle Parks and Recreation is seeking nominations for the Denny Awards, which honor volunteer service to the city’s parks system. The deadline for nominations is Monday, Oct. 13, 2014.

The awards will be presented at a recognition ceremony on Tuesday, Dec.9, 2014 at Rain Forest Pavilion at the Woodland Park Zoo.

The Denny Awards acknowledge and honor the crucial role volunteers play in neighborhood parks, community centers and recreation programs throughout the city. In 2013, 41,244 people volunteered for Seattle Parks racking up 368,448 hours of service. Though the volunteers’ efforts are invaluable to the department, the Corporation for National and Community Service estimates that the value of a volunteer’s time in Washington is $22.69 per hour. That means in 2013, volunteers donated $8,360,085 worth of time to Seattle Parks!

Our volunteers do everything from pulling invasive ivy and planting native trees in our parks to coaching kids’ sports to working as docents at selected parks to serving on various advisory councils and boards.

“Volunteers are one of our most important resources,” said Acting Superintendent Christopher Williams. “Without the help of the community, we could not run the first rate park and recreation system that Seattle depends on.”

The name of the awards reflects the early commitment by the Denny family to the preservation of parkland and open space for public use and enjoyment. David T. and Louisa Denny donated land that became the first Seattle park, Denny Park, in 1884.

Denny Awards nominees should meet the following minimum qualifications. The nominee must have:

  • Demonstrated exceptional stewardship to parks and/or recreation;
  • Provided stellar leadership related to enhancing and preserving parks and/or recreation programs;
  • Demonstrated a significant personal commitment of time and effort to assist Seattle Parks and Recreation; and
  • Gained respect of community peers for efforts to help Seattle Parks and Recreation.

The nomination form for the award, specific criteria and related information (included with this news release) are available by contacting Adrienne Caver-Hall, Seattle Parks and Recreation, 206-684-7710, or adrienne.caver-hall@seattle.gov. To download an electronic version of the nomination form, click the following link: Denny Awards Nomination Form 2014

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Winners Announced for 2013 Annual Denny Awards

Awards recognize exceptional volunteer service

Acting Superintendent Christopher Williams today announced the winners of Seattle Parks and Recreation’s 2013 Denny Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Stewardship. The winners are a cross-section of Seattle’s most tenacious, creative and hard-working volunteers who donate precious time and energy to improving Seattle’s parks and recreational programs.

“It is always difficult for us to choose winners,” Williams said. “All of our volunteers make valuable contributions for which we are deeply grateful. Our intention is to single out those whose work builds community, inspires others and improves lives.”

Each year, more than 40,000 volunteers donate about 350,000 hours to Seattle Parks and Recreation. Their service is valued at between $8 million and $10 million annually. Winners will be recognized at an awards ceremony on Dec. 3 at the Museum of History and Industry.

Special Award

Mary Ann T.  Wiley (posthumous)

Mary Ann became a true friend and benefactor of the Seattle Japanese Garden when she signed up for guide training with the Arboretum Unit 86 volunteer group in 2003. Her enthusiasm for the garden was infectious.  She led more tours than most guides. In 2007 she and her husband Bob made the commitment to raise $500,000 which was half the private funds needed to create the Japanese Garden entry gatehouse. They did this in less than 90 days. Mary Ann died on October 7, 2013, age 83. She is survived by Bob, their two children Robert and Ann, and three granddaughters, Marene, Reagan and Tory.

Healthy Parks Healthy You Award

Jim Neff

Jim coached for Rain City Flyers since the team was organized in 1989, becoming head coach in 1994. The Rain City Flyers is a volunteer organization that partners with Seattle Parks and Recreation to provide opportunities for youth to compete in track and cross-country. Jim is an amazing coach: always positive, he has an easygoing, quiet coaching style appreciated by parents and young athletes alike. His coaching builds a strong community that helps build a positive future for youth in Seattle. Thanks to Jim’s leadership, thousands of youth have learned about cross country, track and field, and most importantly, about life skills.

Wildlife Advocate Award

Birding Volunteers at Discovery Park

The birding volunteers at Discovery Park help Seattle Parks and Recreation as bird tour leaders and citizen scientists conducting a monthly Neighborhood Bird Project survey. have volunteered for over a decade; the stalwarts Neil Zimmerman and Dan Harville have volunteered since the early 1980s. The bordering volunteers combine commitment to Discovery Park, commitment to birds, the ability to contribute to science, and a sense of community developed with fellow volunteers, park staff, and members of the public who enjoy and learn from the seasonal bird tours.

 

Youth Community Stewardship Award

Ryther Aspiring Youth Program

Over the past seven years, the children and teens in the Aspiring Youth Summer Camp have contributed over 10,000 volunteer hours with Seattle Parks and Recreation. As volunteers, campers build a connection to the parks as they work to improve the beautiful natural settings. In the summer of 2013, over 180 campers contributed 2,200 hours of community service at Ravenna Park. Campers have contributed over 1,200 hours each summer since 2007. The young people in Aspiring Youth Summer Camp have autism spectrum disorder and other similar traits. Their experience building trails and improving habitat in the parks gives them an opportunity to give back to the community and gain self-confidence.

 

Making a Difference Award

Alfred Love, Jr.  

Alfred has coached in Seattle Parks and Recreation programs since 1985.  He is dedicated to working with area youth: coaching basketball and teaching life skills through sports.  Alfred has coached as many as four teams during one season.  He has volunteered at Rainier Beach, Van Asselt and Rainier Community Centers throughout his coaching career.  In 2009, Alfred created the non-profit organization Seattle Youth Recreation Foundation to enhance the experience of Seattle Parks and Recreation community centers youth. His organizations host all-season basketball and provides scholarships.

Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Award

Friends of Cheasty Greenspace at Mt. View, co-founders Mary DeJong and Andrea Ostrovsky

Mary DeJong and Andrea Ostrovsky, co-founders of the Friends of Cheasty Greenspace at Mt. View, have led the community and Friends of Cheasty at Mt. View on a mission to reclaim, restore and re-imagine 10 acres of natural area in a 43-acre forested area that separates Beacon Hill and the Rainier Valley.  Over many years, this group has tirelessly demonstrated exceptional stewardship of 10 beautiful acres of parkland and has provided significant and much-needed advocacy to benefit this greenspace. The vision of the Friends of Cheasty Greenspace at Mt. View is expansive and inclusive: in the past six years its dedicated volunteers have put in over 6,000 hours to create a healthy urban wilderness to provide a safe and welcoming place for everyone—especially urban children and youth—to enjoy.

Superintendent’s Award

Cheryl Klinker

Cheryl Klinker is committed to Thornton Creek watershed. For Many years, she has been on a mission to educate the community and share her passion about watershed restoration. Her volunteer work encompasses stewardship of green spaces and participation on several committees.  Cheryl was a member of the Seattle Parks and Recreation Naming Committee and a member of the Citizens Oversight Committee for the 2000 Pro Parks Levy.  Cheryl is an effective team member and leader with a vision for creek restoration.  She emphasizes watershed education and community building in all her work.  Cheryl is currently the chair of the Thornton Creek Watershed Oversight Council.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is extremely grateful to the thousands of people who dedicate themselves “to be good stewards of our environment, and to provide safe and welcoming opportunities to play, learn, contemplate, and build community.”  This year’s nominees include:

  • Stephanie Angelis, volunteer at Lincoln Park through Puget Soundkeeper Alliance
  • Rich Appleton, volunteer at Nora’s Woods and Leschi Natural Area
  • Jim Corson, leader for Friends of Burke Gilman Trail
  • David Dougherty, founder of the Olmsted Park Trust
  • Carol Fisher, president of Lifelong Recreation Advisory Council
  • Friends of Jackson Park Trail, advocates for and participants in the implementation of Jackson Park Trail
  • Friends of Martha Washington Park,  Committed to restoration of Martha Washington Park
  • Groundswell Northwest, volunteers bringing parks and greenspaces to northwest Seattle
  • Homeless Remembrance Project Committee, advocated for and commissioned the Tree of Life in Victor Steinbrueck Park
  • Abdullahi “Abdi” Hussein, community organizer and founder of Techno-Formation Vocational Services
  • Mat and Whitney McBride, leaders in community build project and renovation of Roxhill Park Playground
  • Michael Neguse, community organizer responsible for Ethiopian/Eritrean elder meal program and community lunch
  • Tami Oki, leader in Seattle Canoe/Kayak Club and Green Lake Small Craft Center Advisory member and volunteer
  • Judy Pickens, founder and member of executive committee for Fauntleroy Watershed Council
  • Rainier Beach Community Center Opening Event Committee
  • Karen Ritter, Center for Off-Leash Area co-steward at Lower Woodland Park Off-Leash Area
  • Julianna Ross, Sand Point Arts and Cultural Exchange and Magnuson Park Advisory Committee member
  • Paul Swanson, Sabey Construction and Team, re-built Georgetown Playfield picnic shelter
  • Rob Wunder, president Hiawatha Advisory Council

 The Denny Awards are named after David T. and Louisa Denny, who donated land for the first Seattle park in 1884 (Denny Park), where Seattle Parks and Recreation headquarters is located.

Seattle Parks and Recreation gratefully acknowledges the Denny Award sponsors and supporters:  the Museum of History and Industry, Seattle Parks Foundation, Associated Recreation Council, Parker Design House, Ivar’s, Seattle Aquarium, Seattle Japanese Garden, and Tom Douglas Restaurants.

 

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Seattle Parks and Recreation seeks nominations for annual volunteer service awards

Seattle Parks and Recreation is seeking nominations for the Denny Awards, which honor volunteer service to the city’s parks system. The deadline for nominations is Monday, Oct. 14, 2013.

The awards will be presented at a recognition ceremony on Tuesday, Dec.3, 2013 at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), 860 Terry Ave. N.

The Denny Awards acknowledge and honor the crucial role volunteers play in neighborhood parks, community centers, and recreation programs throughout the city. In 2012, more than 40,000 volunteers donated over 426,000 hours of service to Seattle Parks and Recreation. Their service is valued at between $8 and $10 million annually.

They do everything from pulling invasive ivy and planting native trees in our parks to coaching kids’ sports to working as docents at selected parks to serving on various advisory councils and boards.

“Volunteers are one of our most important resources,” said Acting Superintendent Christopher Williams. “Without the help of the community, we could not run the first rate park and recreation system that Seattle depends on.”

The name of the awards reflects the early commitment by the Denny family to the preservation of parkland and open space for public use and enjoyment. David T. and Louisa Denny donated land that became the first Seattle park, Denny Park, in 1864.

Denny Awards nominees should meet the following minimum qualifications. The nominee must have:

  • Demonstrated exceptional stewardship to parks and/or recreation;
  • Provided stellar leadership related to enhancing and preserving parks and/or recreation programs;
  • Demonstrated a significant personal commitment of time and effort to assist Seattle Parks and Recreation, and
  • Gained respect of community peers for efforts to help Seattle Parks and Recreation.

The nomination form for the award, specific criteria and related information (included with this news release) are available by contacting Karen O’Connor, Seattle Parks and Recreation, 206-684-7241, or karen.o’connor@seattle.gov. To download an electronic version of the nomination form, visit:  http://www.seattle.gov/parks/denny_awards.

 

 

 

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