Seattle Parks and Recreation invites community to participate in design of Smith Cove Park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to participate in the Smith Cove Park project on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Discovery Park Environmental Learning Center, 3801 Discovery Park Blvd. This meeting is an opportunity to learn about the project, meet the design team from Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) and provide input on the design of Seattle’s new waterfront park. Smith Cove Park is located just west of Pier 91 at the foot of Magnolia Hill on Elliott Bay at 1451 23rd Ave, Seattle, WA 98122.

This project will develop the recently acquired 4.9 acre easterly waterfront property and make improvements to the playfield at Smith Cove Park (west of 23rd Ave. W). The expanded park will provide opportunities for active and passive recreation for all ages and abilities, increase environmental-sensitivity, and make the park inviting and usable for more people. Amenities may include pathways, landscaping, waterfront access, a play area, and related improvements.  Improvements will also be made to the existing part of Smith Cove Park used for youth sports to enhance the playability.

In early 2016, Seattle Parks and Recreation hired GGN as the design consultant. GGN and Seattle Parks and Recreation will use the outreach and concept completed by the Friends of Smith Cove Park (FoSCP) as the starting point for the design of the park.

Established in 2014, FoSCP, is a committee of community members and park users. In 2015, FoSCP received a grant from the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods to undertake the initial public outreach and conceptual design for the expansion of Smith Cove Park. Find out more about FOSCP at their website www.SeattleSmithCovePark.org.

For more information on the park and the project, please visit

http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/smith-cove-park-development or contact David Graves, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 684-7048 or david.graves@seattle.gov.

Seattle Channel videos feature Seattle Park District

It’s been just over two years since Seattle voters approved Proposition 1 to create the Seattle Park District, and projects and programs funded by the District are in full swing.

Recently, Seattle Parks and Recreation teamed with the Seattle Channel to produce three 30-minute videos that highlight some of the work being accomplished in neighborhoods throughout the city. The videos, collectively entitled “The Seattle Park District: Investing in People and Parks,” first aired on the Seattle Channel in September and are available online at the links below.

Hosted by veteran television reporter Brian Callanan, the three shows feature different aspects of the Park District, each one beginning with a TV news-like report, followed by a discussion panel with Callanan, Seattle Parks and Recreation Superintendent Jesús Aguirre and two community members:

  • The first episode focuses on Maintaining Parks and Facilities, including maintenance of community centers, forest restoration efforts, playfield resurfacing and the enforcement of leash laws for dogs.1
  • The second episode features Programs for People, including a summer camp for youth with disabilities, the Arts in the Parks Program, the Get Moving Program, which encourages physical activity for people of all ages, and the Senior Food and Fitness Program. 2
  • The third episode highlights projects in the Building for the Future initiative, including parkland acquisition, park improvements, and partnerships to activate downtown parks. 3

Approved by voters in 2014, the Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation. 2016 was the first full year of implementation and has included funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and funds the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information, please visit this web page.

Board of Park Commissioners to hold a Public Hearing on the Community Center Strategic Plan

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The Board of Park Commissioners will hold a public hearing to receive feedback on the Community Center Strategic Plan. The meeting will take place at Van Asselt Community Center (2820 S Myrtle St.), on October 13, 2016 at 6:30pm.

The Community Center Strategic Plan is available here. The Community Center Strategic Plan will lay the foundation for both operational and facility decision-making for the community center system in the future. The 2014 Parks Legacy Plan established two general goals for community centers:

  • Ensure community centers are the focal points in our neighborhoods and serve as places where people can connect, foster relationships, build community, and enhance their health and well-being by offering programs, activities, and events to Seattle’s changing population.
  • Ensure community centers are physically and emotionally safe and welcoming places for individual enrichment and community growth.

The Board of Park Commissioners will receive oral and written testimony, and will make a recommendation to the Parks and Recreation Superintendent based on the feedback they receive from the public. Those who want to give input on the plan but are not able to come to the public hearing can send written comments, which bear equal weight to oral testimony. Please email comments to rachel.acosta@seattle.gov.

Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and there is work going on in every corner of the city. This year includes funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog, and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of urban forests; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

The Seattle Board of Park Commissioners is a nine-member citizen board created by the City Charter. Four members are appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council; four members are appointed by the City Council; and one member is a young adult appointed by YMCA Get Engaged. The Board generally meets twice a month, normally on the second and fourth Thursday, to advise the Parks and Recreation Superintendent, the Mayor, and the City Council on parks and recreation matters.

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites input on design of new Lake City park

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the Lake City community to an Open House on Thurs., Sept. 29, 2016 to provide input on the design of a new park in Lake City. Join SPR planner and ELM Environment’s designers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 12501 28th Ave. NE, just north of the Lake City branch library or from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Lake City Farmer’s Market to learn about the new park and provide design input. Lake City families, neighbors, friends and supporters are encouraged to attend.

SPR purchased the property located at 12510 33rd Ave. NE in 2010 to provide additional open space for the Lake City community. The events on Thurs., Sept. 29 are an opportunity for the community to participate in the design and meet the design team.

Funding for this park project is provided by Seattle Park District. Approved by voters in 2014, this is the first full year of implementation. The Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog for Seattle Parks and Recreation. In addition, it will improve and rehabilitate community centers, preserve the urban forest, perform major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo, perform day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities, provide more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities and programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults, develop new parks, and acquire new park land.

For more information or for meeting notification translation please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/lake_city_uv/ For questions about the project or if you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards at 206-233-0063 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov.

Two Ballard park play areas close for renovation

Gilman Playground (923 NW 54th St) and Webster Park (3025 NW 68th St) play areas are scheduled to close beginning the week of Sept. 5 for approximately four months for renovation. During construction, the Gilman Playground basketball court and surrounding area will be closed; however, the comfort station, east/west walkway and associated stairs and sports fields will remain open. At Webster Park the play area and basketball court will be closed for the duration of construction.

Both play area renovation projects will replace the play equipment, provide access improvements and install new park furnishings. Thank you to everyone who attended the public meetings and provided input on the improvements.

The Seattle Park District provides the funding for these play area improvement projects. The District approved by Seattle voters in 2014 provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation, including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites.

For information about the projects and construction updates please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/gilman_pg/ or http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/webster/. If you have questions about the projects please contact Katie Bang, Seattle Parks and Recreation at 206-684-9286 or katie.bang@seattle.gov.

Seattle Parks and Recreation needs input for A.B. Ernst Park addition

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide feedback on design options for the addition to A.B. Ernst Park. Please join us on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fremont Branch Library, 731 N. 35th St.  This project will expand upon the existing A.B. Ernst Park, provide access for people with disabilities and improve safety and other park features. Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased the parcel to next to A.B. Ernst Park, 719 N 35th St. in 2010.  

Funding for the development of this project is provided by Seattle Park District. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards at 206-233-0064 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/a_b_ernst/

 

Friendly Folk Dance

june 2016 seated stretchy bandFriendly Folk Dance, an international folk dance experience for people with memory loss and their loved ones, had its first series at Yesler Community Center in June. Teaching artist and folk dance instructor Susan Wickett-Ford of Silver Kite Community Arts led eight participants in a variety of dances.

Program participant Alice Padilla loves to dance and is thrilled there is a dementia-friendly dance opportunity that is open to all abilities: “This is so good for us! Dancing gets your whole body going. It is beautiful to see all the smiles from the other dancers, it is fun learning different types of dance. This is a joyful experience that is good for the heart and mind.”

Like so many, folk dance instructor Susan Wickett-Ford has personal experience with memory loss in her family. “I love being part of this so much. Previously in my life I ran from anything that had to do with Alzheimer (books, movies, fundraisers, articles, even conversations) like the plague because it was associated with only horribleness. And now I have these associations with art, and playfulness and joy. Amazing.”

Friendly Folk Dance is funded in part by the Seattle Park District. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously-acquired sites.

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Encouraging healthy activities for older, diverse community members

Food and Fitness (003)Our Food and Fitness Program, funded in part by the Seattle Park District, provides opportunities for older adults to congregate and celebrate their culture and language through weekly gatherings that include a communal lunch and a social, educational, and fitness component.

As part of the program, we offer an Eritrean/Ethiopian meetup at Yesler Community Center with approximately 30 participants, and a Vietnamese meetup at Garfield Community Center with nearly 50 participants. At both sites, the program offers socialization, a lunch, and creative ways to encourage people to be more physically active, in addition to occasional speakers, ongoing ESL classes, and field trips.

Visit our Lifelong Recreation page for more information on fitness and social programs for people 50 and older.

Participants in the Eritrean/Ethiopian group enjoy a hot meal.

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Michael Neguse leads a group in light stretching before sharing a cooked-from-scratch meal with participants.

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Participants play Xiangqi, a game similar to chess.

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Table tennis at the Vietnamese Food and Fitness program.

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Wendy Nguyen teaches an ESL class Tuesdays and Fridays at Garfield Community Center.

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Music in the Mini Park

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The past several weeks have been filled with cultural events supported by Put the Arts in Parks. Made possible by the Seattle Park District and in partnership with the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, Put the Arts in Parks is helping to bring outdoor arts and culture projects to parks around the city this summer.

As part of this program, Lake City Future First is bringing “Music in the Mini Park” to Lake City Mini Park on Wednesdays from 5 to 7p.m. through July 13. Performances so far have included New England contra-dancing and flamenco, to the delight of Lake City locals.

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Celebrating the culture of Oaxaca, Mexico

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The Dr. Blanche Lavizzo Park Amphitheater recently came alive with the bright colors of traditional Oaxacan costumes at the 14th annual Guelaguetza festival, a day-long, family-friendly event featuring live music and dances from Oaxaca, Mexico.

The seats of the amphitheater were overflowing with families gathered to watch the lively dances as performers tossed oranges and limes out to the crowd. “Guelaguetza is a holiday that is about helping and giving. This community is very open and welcoming and keeps that tradition alive,” said one performer.

Guelaguetza is organized by Grupo Cultural Oaxaqueño and the event received support from Put the Arts in Parks. Made possible by the Seattle Park District and in partnership with the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Put the Arts in Parks is helping to bring outdoor arts and culture projects to parks around the city this summer. Click here to view all 2016 Put the Arts in Parks events.  

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