Night Maintenance Team makes South Park Community Center shine!

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Thanks to the 2014 voter-approved Seattle Park District, we’ve added a Night Maintenance Team, which works on a variety of repairs, upgrades, and other preventive maintenance to better preserve our facilities. And because this team works at night, facilities such as our pools and community centers don’t have to be closed, and people can use them during the day!

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Recently, the Night Maintenance Team finished a d three-week maintenance window at South Park Community Center. The painters prepped and painted the gymnasium, kitchen, hallway trim and offices, and did touch-up painting throughout the facility. The plumber replaced all the soft parts in the restroom fixtures, replaced the flush-o-meters and gaskets on the restroom toilets, and lowered and replaced the drinking fountain in the hallway. The carpenter installed new baseboards in the hallways and replaced the countertops in the restrooms. The electrician installed new emergency lighting and guards in the gymnasium and repaired wiring in the computer room.

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The crew also did drain repair work at Mt. Baker Rowing and Sailing Center; worked on the new broiler at Garfield Community Center; and cleaned clogged drains at Golden Gardens Bathhouse and Southwest Teen Life Center.

Thanks to the team for the team for making our community centers look great, while improving their function, efficiency, and safety!

Seattle Parks and Recreation begins repairs on Burke-Gilman Trail

Repairs to five sections of the Burke-Gilman Trail that runs through the University District will begin on Monday, Nov. 7. Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) awarded the construction contract for repairs to Westwater Construction. Work is scheduled to be completed in early 2017. This project will repair sections of the trail, remove areas of asphalt in disrepair, remove invasive roots that are causing upheaval, and replace those sections with new asphalt. Trail sections were determined by 2015 condition-assessment work done in collaboration with Seattle Department of Transportation.

Cyclists and pedestrians will be detoured around the construction area onto side streets. The contractor will work on one section at a time, from east to west, to reduce the impact to trail users. Please visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs for more information about the detour routes.img_0818

SPR will also perform small asphalt repairs on the Burke-Gilman Trail in November between Gas Works Park (Meridian Ave. N) and the I-5 bridge, and may require cyclists to dismount and walk around repair work (no detour route will be required). 

 he Seattle Park District provides $500,000 in funding for this Burke-Gilman Trail improvement project. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267 million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

 For more information, please visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs or contact Sandi Albertsen, Project Manager, at sandra.albertsen@seattle.gov or 206-684-8938.

 

 

 

Community invited to provide input on design of new Greenwood/Phinney park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input on design options for the new park in the Greenwood/Phinney neighborhood. Join Seattle Parks and Recreation’s planner and Cascade Design Collaborative’s designers at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N in room 7, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2. The design options include elements the community has identified as important such as play, open space, seating, spaces for gathering and fellowship, as well as attractive landscaping. Families, neighbors, and the Phinney/Greenwood community is encouraged to attend.

Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased two property sites between N 81st and N 82nd on the east side of Greenwood to develop a park (the mini-mart greenwood-landbankedsite purchased in Nov. 2012 and the pub property immediately north, which was purchased in July 2015). The two buildings will be demolished in fall 2016.

 The Seattle Park District will fund the development of the south parcel to provide the Greenwood/Phinney urban area access to open space. Design and public input will be completed for both the north and south parcels to create a seamless design, however, only the south parcel will be constructed in 2017. The north parcel will include open lawn until funding for the north parcel is received.

 For community members that are unable to attend the meeting, the design option boards and comment sheets will be posted at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, the Greenwood branch library and on the project website following the public meeting on Nov. 2.

Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations, please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 206-233-0064 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/greenwood_phinney_uv/.

 

 

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation needs input for A.B. Ernst Park Addition

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide feedback on the schematic design for the addition to A.B. Ernst Park. Please join us on Monday, October 24, 2016 from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Doric Temple #92, 619 N. 36th St. prior to the Fremont Neighborhood Council meeting for an open house. In addition, we will do a short presentation at the beginning of the Fremont Neighborhood Council meeting at 7 p.m.

This project will expand upon the existing A.B. Ernst Park, provide access for people with disabilities and improve safety and other park features. Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased the parcel next to A.B. Ernst Park, 719 N 35th St. in 2010. Thank you to all who participated in our previous events and in the on-line survey. We incorporated your input into the plan for the park and encourage you to come to the final meeting for this park project.

The Seattle Park District provides $750,000 in funding for the capital improvement project which includes the construction budget for $465,000. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

Thank you to the FNC for hosting this meeting and for their continued support of Seattle Parks and Recreation. The Fremont Neighborhood Council (FNC) has been working on behalf of Fremont residents since 1980. We collaborate on issues including public safety, transportation, land use, historic preservation, housing, and parks and help support neighbors’ special projects and more. Visit the Fremont Neighborhood Council website at fremontneighborhoodcouncil.org to find our meeting schedule and membership information or contact us at Fremont.Neighborhood.Council@gmail.com.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations, please contact Karen O’Connor at karen.o’connor@seattle.gov or 206-233-7929. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/a_b_ernst/

 

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation opens Lincoln Park north play area

Lincoln Park play area is open. The renovated north play area features ‘tree house’ elements, a cable ride, new play equipment, a plaza and interactive information on migratory birds that can be found in Lincoln Park. The park also features inclusive and accessible play elements for all such as a group saucer swing, an accessible cable ride, an accessible sand table, and a small alcove for sensory sensitive children.

Pathways between the shelter and the play area, additional plantings around the play area, and the accessible pathway connection to Fauntleroy Way SW is anticipated to be completed by the end of October 2016.

The Seattle Park District provided the funding for this renovation.  Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of urban forests; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/lincoln/north_pa/  or contact Katie Bang at 206-684-9286  or katie.bang@seattle.gov.

Seattle Parks and Recreation needs input on play equipment for Prentis Frazier Park

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the community to a public meeting on Wed., Oct. 19, 2016 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Miller Community Center, 330 19th Ave E. for Prentis Frazier play area renovation project. This meeting is an opportunity for the community to learn about the renovation project and provide input on play equipment options.

This project will replace play equipment, provide access improvements for people with disabilities and improve safety and other features at the park. Prentis Frazier Park is located at 401 24th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112. SPR will gather community input and answer questions about the new play equipment.

Families, neighbors and park supporters are encouraged to attend. To encourage additional feedback and help accommodate different schedules, we will also provide a play area option survey. Please visit the project website between Oct. 20 through Oct. 31 to participate in the survey and provide input.

The Seattle Park District provides the funding for this renovation. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of urban forests; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/prentis-frazier-park-play-area-renovation or contact Jay.Rood@seattle.gov or 206-733-9194.

Seattle Park District helping to improve play areas across Seattle

21658934195_8a44c8e57d_kPlay areas at neighborhood parks provide a place for kids to exercise safely outdoors, explore the natural world, develop their imagination, interact with others and discover their community, all while having some good old fashioned fun! But play areas that are poorly accessible, or filled with worn and outdated play equipment, can put a serious damper on all that activity.

This year, thanks to the voter-approved Seattle Park District, $2 million dollars is being invested into play area renovations at park sites across Seattle. As part of the Park District’s Fix It First Initiative, renovations include new play equipment and necessary safety and ADA-accessibility improvements. These renovations will help ensure that our play areas remain safe, welcoming and engaging for kids for years to come.

Construction is currently taking place at Lincoln Park, Webster Park and Gilman Playground play areas, with preliminary plans underway for Prentis Frazier, Georgetown, High Point, Dearborn, Discovery, Hiawatha, and South Park play areas.

Webster Park:

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Construction on the new play area at Webster Park in Ballard is in full swing! This project will install updated play equipment and improve access to the park, as well as add play structures and seating accessible to children of all ages and abilities. Demolition of the old play equipment is complete, concrete foundations have been formed for new rocks and rope-climbing equipment, and concrete curbs have been poured for the new sand pit and the new accessible entrance. At the beginning of construction, we heard many comments from the community about wanting to keep the old rainbow slide as it brought a sense of identity to the neighborhood. After hearing this, we decided to change the proposed slide from the original solid green color to ‘rainbow’ to honor this unique aspect of the park.

Gilman Playground:

gilman-realGilman Playground in Ballard features ballfields, tennis courts, a play area and a wading pool. The play area renovation project will install updated play equipment based on feedback we heard from the community, which included an interest in climbable structures, swings, and modern and nature-themed equipment. The contractor has mobilized, and demolition of the old play equipment is complete; installation of the new equipment is scheduled to begin in October.

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Removal of play equipment at Gilman Playground.

Lincoln Park:

lincoln-park-realLincoln Park is West Seattle’s major multi-purpose park. It features miles of trails, rocky beaches, grassy forests and meadows, picnic areas and more. The Lincoln Park North Play Area Renovation project will install updated play equipment, improve access and install new structures accessible to children of all ages and abilities. Construction is underway and a new seating area next to the wading pool is now open! This accessible table area features picnic tables and two barbecues. The bird plaza has been formed, and installation of the play equipment is underway. This is anticipated to be complete mid-October, after which construction will shift to finishing up concrete work, installing drainage, and installing engineered wood chips. We are thrilled to report that we are still on target to open at the end of October!

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New play equipment going in at Lincoln Park.

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A new sitting area at the Lincoln Park North Play Area.

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation and Mayor Murray’s proposed budget

On Sept. 26, Mayor Murray presented his 2017-2018 Proposed Budget to City Council, and I am pleased to inform you of a few items related to Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) programs and services. The Mayor’s budget makes critical investment in expanding access to our community centers and maintaining our parks as the gems of our city.

Proposed Fee Changes

Download the PDFs below for details on the fee changes proposed in the 2017-18 budget.

 

Seattle Park District              

In 2017, the Seattle Park District will be in year three of its first six-year spending plan. This voter-approved permanent funding to support parks and recreation services is the single biggest change to SPR operations in 100 years. In 2017, we will continue to carry out the initiatives in the spending plan and to report to the Oversight Committee and the public on our progress. By the end of 2017, we will be at the halfway point of this six-year planning cycle – time flies.

Community Center Operations

The proposed 2017 budget shifts $1.3 million in Park District funding from the capital side to the operating side to meet community needs by increasing hours of operation and staffing at centers in neighborhoods with fewer resources to pay for programming. This shift is a recommendation of the draft Community Center Strategic Plan The increases will result in improved participant-to-staff ratios, more capacity to pursue community partnerships, and increased access to the centers for the community. You can learn more by reviewing the Mayor’s press release at http://murray.seattle.gov/mayor-unveils-new-strategic-plan-for-citys-community-centers/.

Non-District Related Changes

Park Rangers

As our approach to enlivening downtown parks has evolved, the proposed budget includes the elimination of 1.5 vacant Park Ranger positions. With Park District funding for the Urban Parks Partnership Initiative, we have entered into contracts with downtown entities to provide physical improvements and public programming in downtown parks. Following a pilot project conducted in 2015-16, we entered into a five-year contract with the Downtown Seattle Association to continue to activate Westlake Park and Occidental Square through food trucks, plantings and colorful furniture, games and active play, classes and events, and much more. In 2016, similar agreements were negotiated with Cascade Playground Activation Committee, Jim Ellis Freeway Park Association, InterIm Community Development Association and Friends of Belltown Parks to activate Cascade Playground, Donnie Chin International Children’s Park, Freeway Park, Hing Hay Park, Kobe Terrace Park, and Bell Street Park.

Capital Improvement Plan:

SPR’s 2017 capital budget is growing significantly – from $21 million in 2015 and $59 million in 2016 to $75 million in 2017 and $84 million in 2018. The capital budget maintains a strong commitment to asset preservation. In addition to the almost $37 million worth of projects funded by the Seattle Park District, the projects proposed for REET (Real Estate Excise Tax) revenues are prioritized consistent with SPR’s asset management criteria. Ongoing major maintenance projects, such as environmental remediation, landscape and forest restoration, irrigation system repair, pavement restoration, and replacing major roof and HVAC systems, address basic infrastructure needs across the system. The 2017 budget also provides REET funding for remediation work at Lake Union Park and Victor Steinbrueck Park.

Lake Union Park

The 2017 budget includes $3.6 million to correct problems with settling at Lake Union Park, including the walkways, pedestrian bridge and the park’s pond. After a regular inspection showed movement on the east abutment of the bridge, SPR commissioned a geotechnical assessment that revealed continued settling, which will be corrected through the removal of soil and use of lightweight geofoam.

Victor Steinbrueck Park

A current project funded by the 2008 Parks and Green Spaces Levy is now in the planning phase at the park and includes improving sight lines into the park, renovating seating, renovating the former children’s play area, improving and expanding lighting, and upgrading landscaping. The park sits atop a privately-owned parking garage, and the waterproof membrane between the westerly portion of the park and the parking garage below is failing. The Mayor’s budget includes $3.5 million over two years to make major repairs to, or replace, the membrane.

Athletic Fields Projects

As mentioned below, revenues from increased athletic field use fees will support investments to expand athletic field capacity. By 2018, $600,000 per year in fee revenues will be collected to improve or expand athletic fields. In addition, there is $2.6 million of REET funds to help fund improvements at three fields in 2017-2018: Brighton Playfield, Soundview Playfield and a third field planned to be improved in partnership with another agency.

Fees

The Mayor’s proposed budget includes increases in fees for scheduling athletic fields, park event permits (both last increased in 2011) and swimming pools (last increased in 2013). The fee revenues, along with the General Fund, support increases in inflationary costs necessary to provide these amenities and services to the public. The fee increases for athletic fields will also support investments in our fields. By 2018, these athletic field fee increases are estimated to raise an additional $1 million annually. Of that, $600,000 each year will be transferred to the capital budget in order to support field improvement projects.

Overall, the 2017 Proposed Budget is a good news story with the Park District in full swing along with additional investments to help us meet new technology mandates and to expand our operational capacity. The investments outlined in the Mayor’s Proposed Budget will allow Seattle Parks and Recreation to continue to provide exceptional services to our growing community; this is truly an exciting time for SPR.

Please let City Councilmembers know that you support these budget changes by emailing the Council through the Council website or by attending one of the two Council budget hearings scheduled for the following dates:

  • October 5, 2016 at 5:30 p.m., Seattle City Hall in Council Chambers; and
  • October 25, 2016 at 5:30 p.m., Seattle City Hall in Council Chambers.

Many thanks to you for your continued support of and involvement with our programs and services, and to Mayor Murray for including these proposals as part of his 2017-2018 Proposed Budget.

 

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Jesús Aguirre
Superintendent
Seattle Parks and Recreation

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites community to participate in design of Smith Cove Park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to participate in the Smith Cove Park project on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Discovery Park Environmental Learning Center, 3801 Discovery Park Blvd. This meeting is an opportunity to learn about the project, meet the design team from Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) and provide input on the design of Seattle’s new waterfront park. Smith Cove Park is located just west of Pier 91 at the foot of Magnolia Hill on Elliott Bay at 1451 23rd Ave, Seattle, WA 98122.

This project will develop the recently acquired 4.9 acre easterly waterfront property and make improvements to the playfield at Smith Cove Park (west of 23rd Ave. W). The expanded park will provide opportunities for active and passive recreation for all ages and abilities, increase environmental-sensitivity, and make the park inviting and usable for more people. Amenities may include pathways, landscaping, waterfront access, a play area, and related improvements.  Improvements will also be made to the existing part of Smith Cove Park used for youth sports to enhance the playability.

In early 2016, Seattle Parks and Recreation hired GGN as the design consultant. GGN and Seattle Parks and Recreation will use the outreach and concept completed by the Friends of Smith Cove Park (FoSCP) as the starting point for the design of the park.

Established in 2014, FoSCP, is a committee of community members and park users. In 2015, FoSCP received a grant from the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods to undertake the initial public outreach and conceptual design for the expansion of Smith Cove Park. Find out more about FOSCP at their website www.SeattleSmithCovePark.org.

For more information on the park and the project, please visit

http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/smith-cove-park-development or contact David Graves, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 684-7048 or david.graves@seattle.gov.

Seattle Channel videos feature Seattle Park District

It’s been just over two years since Seattle voters approved Proposition 1 to create the Seattle Park District, and projects and programs funded by the District are in full swing.

Recently, Seattle Parks and Recreation teamed with the Seattle Channel to produce three 30-minute videos that highlight some of the work being accomplished in neighborhoods throughout the city. The videos, collectively entitled “The Seattle Park District: Investing in People and Parks,” first aired on the Seattle Channel in September and are available online at the links below.

Hosted by veteran television reporter Brian Callanan, the three shows feature different aspects of the Park District, each one beginning with a TV news-like report, followed by a discussion panel with Callanan, Seattle Parks and Recreation Superintendent Jesús Aguirre and two community members:

  • The first episode focuses on Maintaining Parks and Facilities, including maintenance of community centers, forest restoration efforts, playfield resurfacing and the enforcement of leash laws for dogs.1
  • The second episode features Programs for People, including a summer camp for youth with disabilities, the Arts in the Parks Program, the Get Moving Program, which encourages physical activity for people of all ages, and the Senior Food and Fitness Program. 2
  • The third episode highlights projects in the Building for the Future initiative, including parkland acquisition, park improvements, and partnerships to activate downtown parks. 3

Approved by voters in 2014, the Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation. 2016 was the first full year of implementation and has included funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and funds the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information, please visit this web page.