Seattle Parks needs your input on the future of trails

Seattle Parks and Recreation seeks input from trail enthusiasts on how to preserve and develop Seattle Parks and Recreation soft surface walking and hiking paths. In April, Parks hosted two public meetings to gather input on park trails, and now asks the public to take the short survey located at http://seattle.gov/parks/Environment/Trails/whatisthe.htm and provide us with additional information.

Trails and related activities rank high on the list of activities that Seattleites enjoy, and the public survey will provide essential direction in how Parks protects and improves these assets. 

Seattle Parks and Recreation is using its trails inventory not only to plan work for the next five years, but to create an opportunity to work with stakeholders, citizens, and community organizations to develop partnerships and a longer term vision for our trail system through 2020 and beyond.

For more information on Seattle Parks and Recreation Trail system, please visit: http://seattle.gov/parks/trails.asp or contact Chukundi Salisbury, Trails Program Coordinator, Seattle Parks and Recreation, 1600 South Dakota Street, Seattle, WA 98108, 206-684-4122, or email: Chukundi.salisbury@seattle.gov.

Planning Meeting for Seattle’s Urban Park Trails

Seattle Parks and Recreation is hosting two public meetings to invite ideas for park trails. Both meetings will take place from 7 – 8 p.m.

  • Tuesday, April 19, 2011 at Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave. S, Seattle 98118
  • Thursday, April 21, 2011 at Meadowbrook Community Center,10517 35th Ave NE, Seattle 98125

These meetings are an opportunity for trail enthusiasts to provide input and ideas on how to preserve and develop Seattle Parks and Recreation soft surface walking and hiking paths. Trails and related activities rank very high on the list of activities that Seattlites enjoy, and these meetings will provide essential direction in how Parks protects and improves these assets. 

“Trails are the entry way for the public to enjoy our urban forests,”, said Mark Mead, Seattle Parks Senior Urban Forester. “While the user groups vary greatly from joggers to bird watchers to folks getting from one side of the neighborhood to the next, this process will allow us to connect better with them on a common thread: safe and accessible trails.” 

Parks is using its trails inventory to not only plan work for the next five years and beyond, but is taking this opportunity to work with stakeholders, citizens, and community organizations to develop partnerships and a vision for our trail system. 

For more information on Seattle Parks and Recreation Trail system, please visit http://seattle.gov/parks/trails.asp or contact Chukundi Salisbury, Seattle Parks and Recreation Trails Program Coordinator, at 1600 South Dakota Street, Seattle, WA 98108, 206-684-4122, or Chukundi.salisbury@seattle.gov

###

Conservation Assoications Build Trails

Conservation Leadership Corps Orientation at Camp Long

Recently, Seattle Conservation Association (SCA) and Washington Conservation Corps (WCC) worked on a project at the SE entrance to Camp Long.

The Student Conservation Association  is a national nonprofit organization founded in 1957 to restore and protect America’s public lands and preserve them for future generations.

SCA members are high school and college-age volunteers who build trails, restore habitat, guide interpretive hikes, study plants and animals, and participate in many other conservation-related projects.

For the past several years, SCA Seattle’s Conservation Leadership Corps has started off their year at Camp Long. The Conservation Leadership Corps (CLC) exposes high school students to nature and the outdoors by combining restoration service work and recreation in Seattle area greenspaces. Through hands-on volunteer projects, CLC teaches leadership, teamwork, backcountry and wilderness skills while students complete more than 100 hours of service learning. 

Earlier this month, Camp Long again hosted the CLC Orientation which includes service project stations that introduce the skills and knowledge to be gained throughout the year. CLC members commit to one weekend a month and one evening meeting a month. Members can participate with CLC for one to three years, taking on more responsibility as they gain experience. 

Here is a list of their accomplishments: Removed invasives: 495 sq. ft.; Graded trail: 40 ft.; Graveled trail: 35 ft.; Box steps built: 3; Trash removed: 1 garbage bag + odds and ends.  Photographs: http://www.flickr.com/photos/the-sca/sets/72157625816829684/

The City of Seattle WCC  Trails Crew marks the commitment of Seattle Parks and Recreation to address the need for trail maintenance, trail construction, and trail development standards within 4000+ acres of natural areas throughout the City. This crew works throughout the City Parks System to upgrade trails, construct new trail, and work with volunteer organizations and community members to improve the recreational opportunities for citizens and visiting tourists.

The crew consists of 6 members. Five members are a part of AmeriCorps and the Department of Ecology serving in a year-long term to work in Seattle Parks.  The crew members work for a stipend provided through collaborative funding of the AmeriCorps project.

In Camp Long the crew has been working under the supervision of Jacobo Jimenez and Rory Denovan, preforming work on specific restoration sites as well as the trails of the Camp Long. More specifically the south entrance the crew finished up where SCA started with installing box steps and a 6 foot crib wall, they pulled blackberries, mulched and planted the south entrance to help the entry look more appealing to hikers and visitors.

Funding for materials and support come from Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Trails Program. This CIP (Capitol Improvement Project) is the result of identifying Trails and Forested areas as Capital Assets and a commitment to maintaining that infrastructure Citywide.

# # #