Moving the Giants project comes to Puget Sound

Join us at the Jefferson Park planting of redwoods

Seattle Parks and Recreation and Plant for the Planet invite the community to a planting celebration for redwood saplings on Saturday, December 10, 2016 at 10 a.m. in Jefferson Park (3801 Beacon Ave. S), at the southwest corner of S Spokane St. and Beacon Ave. S. Plant for the Planet, a world-wide kid-run organization of 8- to 14-year-olds interested in tree planting, keeping fossil fuels in the ground, and fighting poverty through climate justice will plant the redwood saplings and perform a world premiere “Be Like a Tree,” composed by the group.little-girl-with-sapling-10-24-2016-10-11-pmc1

Redwoods are among the oldest, largest, most iconic trees on earth. As part of the Moving the Giants project, 300 Coast Redwood saplings will be delivered to 26 communities around the Puget Sound from December to January. Many other communities are planning special events for tree plantings.

These 300 Coast Redwood saplings have the same genetic structure as some of the world’s oldest and largest trees, have survived 3,000 years or more, and have the capacity to remove and sequester airborne carbon like no other species according to a team of researchers at Humboldt State University and the University of Washington.

The redwood clones result from the work of Archangel Ancient Tree Archive – a Copemish, Michigan not-for-profit that collects, archives, and propagates the world’s most important old-growth trees before they are gone. Their work is described in a 10-minute award-winning film by Michael Ramsey called  Moving the Giants – An Urgent Plan to Save the Planet.

For more information on the event or this project please contact Philip Stielstra at 206-949-3804 or pstielstra@comcast.net, or visit the Moving the Giants to Puget Sound Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/MovingTheGiantsToPugetSound/.

Community input needed for renovation and proposed expansion of the Seattle Asian Art Museum

On Sat., Dec. 10, 2016 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. the community is invited to attend a meeting about the renovation and proposed expansion of the Seattle Asian Art Museum. The meeting will be held at the Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E Prospect St. in Volunteer Park. It is an opportunity to learn more about and provide input on the preservation, infrastructure improvements and proposed expansion plans for the Asian Art Museum.

dsc04443The renovation and expansion goals include preserving the historic building; improving the museum’s infrastructure; protecting the collection with climate control and seismic system upgrades; adding gallery and education space with an expansion into the east side of Volunteer Park; and enhancing ADA accessibility and the museum’s connection to the park.

Renovation and proposed expansion plans are in progress and your input will help implement changes that will best serve the Asian Art Museum and park visitors. Depending on the design evolution, permitting and other processes, the current estimated timeline is to start construction in September 2017. Construction is anticipated to last one year, followed by another six months to move art back into the building.

To learn more about the project and to provide feedback, please visit http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/inspire. For additional information visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/seattle-asian-art-museum-improvements.

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input on the 2017 Development Plan, Gap Analysis and Long-term Acquisition Strategies

Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) invites the community to participate in citywide open house meetings and provide input on SPR’s 2017 Development Plan, Gap Analysis and Long-term Acquisition strategies for open space. SPR will participate in five geographically located meetings in conjunction with other City departments. These meetings are an opportunity for the community to learn about SPR’s walkability mapping and give input on priorities for long-term open space acquisition goals.

The first open house meeting is Sat., Dec. 3, 2016 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Bitter Lake Community Center, 13035 Linden Ave. N.  

The 2017 Development Plan is a 6-year plan that documents and describes SPR facilities and lands, looks at Seattle’s changing demographics, and lays out a vision for the future. A goal in the Seattle 2035 Comprehensive Plan is to consider access to our parks by transit, bicycle, and on foot when acquiring, siting and designing new park facilities or improving existing ones. SPR manages approximately 11% of the City’s land area, and is proposing a new mapping approach based upon walkability to inform the City’s long-term acquisition strategies for future open space.

Other opportunities to learn about the plan include participating in any of the events below:

  • Dec 7, 2016 – 5:30-7:30 p.m. in West Seattle at Shelby’s Creamery 4752 California Ave. SW
  • Dec 13, 2016 – 6:00-8:00 p.m. in University District at  Ravenna-Eckstein Community Center , 6535 Ravenna Ave NE
  • Jan 10, 2017 -6:00-8:00 p.m. on First Hill at Capitol Hill Optimism Brewing, 1158 Broadway
  • Feb 4, 2017 – 10:00 a.m.- noon in Columbia City at Columbia City Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave S

For more information and to learn about the other input opportunities, please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/policies-and-plans/2017-development-plan or contact Susanne Rockwell, Project Manager at Susanne.rockwell@seattle.gov or 206-684-7133, or 2017DevPlan@seattle.gov

For more information on the Housing Affordability and Livability(HALA) community events and to see which City departments will be attending please visit http://www.seattle.gov/hala/calendar.

 

 

 

Work to repair the Burke-Gilman Trail and detour will be completed on Dec. 2, 2016

Repairs to four sections of the Burke-Gilman Trail that runs through the University District are complete and the final section will be completed on Fri. Dec 2, 2016. This final section detours cyclists off the trail near the University of Washington campus onto 25th Ave. NE. This detour is less than a half a mile and the best alternative route.

Cyclists and pedestrians are asked to use caution in this area. Please dismount and walk bikes when crossing at Pend Oreille Road NE and 25th NE. The contractor has flaggers on the trail during working hours; please follow the signs. Seattle Parks and Recreation regrets the inconvenience to trail users and appreciates their cooperation. For the detour map visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs.

The Seattle Park District provides $500,000 in funding for this Burke-Gilman Trail improvement project. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267 million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information, please visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs or contact Sandi Albertsen, Project Manager, at sandra.albertsen@seattle.gov or 206-684-8938.

 

 

Seattle Park District funds swimming beach piling replacement projects at Green Lake and Lake Washington

Seattle Parks and Recreation awarded Quigg Brothers, Inc. the construction contract to replace the pilings at seven swimming beaches along Lake Washington and two swimming beaches at Green Lake. The project will replace selected wood pilings used to secure swim area ropes and floats with steel helical pipe piles. The piling replacement will improve safety at these public beaches.

This project includes both the west and east swim beaches at Green Lake Park and the beaches along Lake Washington: Seward Park, Mount Baker Park, Madrona Park, Madison Park, Matthews Beach Park and Magnuson Park.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is working to minimize construction impacts and manage environmental impact issues. All Lake Washington swim beach work will be done from the water. The projects at Green Lake Park will require temporary closure of the trail near the Small Craft Center. On the morning of Tues. Nov. 22, there will be intermittent closure of the trail to launch the barge and crane. We anticipate closing the trail again on the morning of Tues. Dec 6 to remove the barge and crane.

The Seattle Park District provides $500,000 in funding for these swim beach improvement projects. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267 million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

For more information, please contact Kent Scott, Sr. Capitol Project Coordinator, at kent.scott@seattle.gov or 206-386-4388.

Community invited to learn about the renovation and proposed expansion of the Seattle Asian Art Museum

On Sat., Nov. 19 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. the community is invited to attend a community meeting at the Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E Prospect St. in Volunteer Park about the renovation and proposed expansion of its historic building. This meeting is co-hosted by Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Seattle Art Museum (SAM). It is an opportunity to learn more about the preservation, infrastructure improvements and proposed expansion plans for the Asian Art Museum.

The renovation and expansion goals include preserving the historic building; improving the museum’s infrastructure; protecting the collection with climate control and seismic system upgrades; adding gallery and education space with an expansion into the east side of Volunteer Park; and enhancing ADA accessibility and the museum’s connection to the park.

Renovation and proposed expansion plans are in progress and your input will help implement changes that will best serve the Asian Art Museum and park visitors. Depending on the design evolution, permitting and other processes, the current estimated timeline is to start construction in September 2017.  Construction is anticipated to last one year, followed by another six months to move art back into the building. 

To learn more about the project and to provide feedback, please visit http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/inspire.  For additional information visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/seattle-asian-art-museum-improvements.

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation begins repairs on Burke-Gilman Trail

Repairs to five sections of the Burke-Gilman Trail that runs through the University District will begin on Monday, Nov. 7. Seattle Parks and Recreation (SPR) awarded the construction contract for repairs to Westwater Construction. Work is scheduled to be completed in early 2017. This project will repair sections of the trail, remove areas of asphalt in disrepair, remove invasive roots that are causing upheaval, and replace those sections with new asphalt. Trail sections were determined by 2015 condition-assessment work done in collaboration with Seattle Department of Transportation.

Cyclists and pedestrians will be detoured around the construction area onto side streets. The contractor will work on one section at a time, from east to west, to reduce the impact to trail users. Please visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs for more information about the detour routes.img_0818

SPR will also perform small asphalt repairs on the Burke-Gilman Trail in November between Gas Works Park (Meridian Ave. N) and the I-5 bridge, and may require cyclists to dismount and walk around repair work (no detour route will be required). 

 he Seattle Park District provides $500,000 in funding for this Burke-Gilman Trail improvement project. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267 million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

 For more information, please visit www.seattle.gov/parks/about-us/current-projects/burke-gilman-trail-repairs or contact Sandi Albertsen, Project Manager, at sandra.albertsen@seattle.gov or 206-684-8938.

 

 

 

Community invited to provide input on design of new Greenwood/Phinney park

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide input on design options for the new park in the Greenwood/Phinney neighborhood. Join Seattle Parks and Recreation’s planner and Cascade Design Collaborative’s designers at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, 6532 Phinney Ave. N in room 7, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 2. The design options include elements the community has identified as important such as play, open space, seating, spaces for gathering and fellowship, as well as attractive landscaping. Families, neighbors, and the Phinney/Greenwood community is encouraged to attend.

Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased two property sites between N 81st and N 82nd on the east side of Greenwood to develop a park (the mini-mart greenwood-landbankedsite purchased in Nov. 2012 and the pub property immediately north, which was purchased in July 2015). The two buildings will be demolished in fall 2016.

 The Seattle Park District will fund the development of the south parcel to provide the Greenwood/Phinney urban area access to open space. Design and public input will be completed for both the north and south parcels to create a seamless design, however, only the south parcel will be constructed in 2017. The north parcel will include open lawn until funding for the north parcel is received.

 For community members that are unable to attend the meeting, the design option boards and comment sheets will be posted at the Phinney Neighborhood Center, the Greenwood branch library and on the project website following the public meeting on Nov. 2.

Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations, please contact Karimah Cooper Edwards, Seattle Parks and Recreation, at 206-233-0064 or Karimah.edwards@seattle.gov. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/greenwood_phinney_uv/.

 

 

 

Seattle Parks and Recreation needs input for A.B. Ernst Park Addition

Seattle Parks and Recreation invites the community to provide feedback on the schematic design for the addition to A.B. Ernst Park. Please join us on Monday, October 24, 2016 from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Doric Temple #92, 619 N. 36th St. prior to the Fremont Neighborhood Council meeting for an open house. In addition, we will do a short presentation at the beginning of the Fremont Neighborhood Council meeting at 7 p.m.

This project will expand upon the existing A.B. Ernst Park, provide access for people with disabilities and improve safety and other park features. Seattle Parks and Recreation purchased the parcel next to A.B. Ernst Park, 719 N 35th St. in 2010. Thank you to all who participated in our previous events and in the on-line survey. We incorporated your input into the plan for the park and encourage you to come to the final meeting for this park project.

The Seattle Park District provides $750,000 in funding for the capital improvement project which includes the construction budget for $465,000. Approved by voters in 2014, the Seattle Park District provides more than $47 million a year in long-term funding for Seattle Parks and Recreation including maintenance of parklands and facilities, operation of community centers and recreation programs, and development of new neighborhood parks on previously acquired sites. 2016 is the first full year of implementation and will include funding to tackle the $267-million major maintenance backlog; and will fund the improvement and rehabilitation of community centers; preservation of the urban forest; major maintenance at the Aquarium and Zoo; day-to-day maintenance of parks and facilities; more recreation opportunities for people from underserved communities, programs for young people, people with disabilities, and older adults; development of new parks; and acquisition of new park land.

Thank you to the FNC for hosting this meeting and for their continued support of Seattle Parks and Recreation. The Fremont Neighborhood Council (FNC) has been working on behalf of Fremont residents since 1980. We collaborate on issues including public safety, transportation, land use, historic preservation, housing, and parks and help support neighbors’ special projects and more. Visit the Fremont Neighborhood Council website at fremontneighborhoodcouncil.org to find our meeting schedule and membership information or contact us at Fremont.Neighborhood.Council@gmail.com.

If you need an interpreter or accommodations, please contact Karen O’Connor at karen.o’connor@seattle.gov or 206-233-7929. For more information about the project please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/projects/a_b_ernst/

 

 

Community invited to celebrate the gift of Julia Lee’s Park

Seattle Parks and Recreation, Seattle Parks Foundation and the Knudsen family in14379590_10206718431071594_7611943832882210348_o-2vite the community to the celebration for Julia Lee’s Park, a new City park, on Monday, Oct. 24, 2016 from noon to 1 p.m. The event will feature music, light refreshments and a program to begin at 12:30 p.m.  This celebration honors the Knudsen family gift of Julia Lee’s Park, located at E Harrison St. & Martin Luther King Jr. Way S, to the City of Seattle and Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Calvert Knudsen established Julia Lee’s Park in 1993 as a statement of his love for his wife and life partner Julia Lee Roderick Knudsen who passed away in 1990. “Our father created this park as a physical representation of the depth and power of love between him and our mother,” said their daughter, Page Knudsen Cowles. “He believed that a small neighborhood park in Madison Valley would uniquely serve as a memorial to her, while further enhancing the greater Madison Park community with a natural, quiet place for reflection and enjoyment.”

The park holds a piazza style garden, handsome wooden benches and has become a green and peaceful meeting place for Madison Valley residents of all ages.

The Knudsen Family is pleased to donate this special park to the City of Seattle and encourages the community to attend and learn more about the park.

For more information on the park please visit http://www.seattle.gov/parks/julialeespark or contact Karen O’Connor at karen.o’connor@seattle.gov or 206-233-7929.